More than 20 teams have already formed for this year's Relay For Life at Huntington High School. (Darin Reed photo.)

Huntington’s Relay For Life 2019 Takes Shape

More than 20 teams have already formed for this year's Relay For Life at Huntington High School. (Darin Reed photo.)

March 11, 2019

An enthusiastic organizing committee is helping Huntington High School’s Relay For Life take shape. A school-wide kick-off assembly recently jump-started this year’s initiative, which has already attracted 20 teams and $8,000 in contributions.

The event is being chaired by Noah Morris, Meagan-Elise Malone and Katie Burton. Andy Ulloa (publicity/social media), Gigi Devoe (luminaria), Jenna Yabroudy (survivorship), Sam Roberts (entertainment) and Riva Bergman (fundraising) are heading up major aspects of this year’s campaign. Principal Brenden Cusack has thrown his complete support behind the group.

The opening ceremony for this year’s Relay For Life is set for Saturday, June 15 at 6 p.m. The event will continue throughout the night and conclude at daybreak on Sunday, June 16. There will be entertainment, food and fun activities throughout the evening to keep everyone going. Organizers have an ambitious goal of raising $100,000 for the American Cancer Society.

“Relay For Life is an amazing event that will change your life at Huntington High School,” Mr. Ulloa said. “Relay brings the whole community together, which is one of my favorite things. The committee has been hard at work planning this year’s Relay.”

The organizing committee includes 48 students. “Everyone has a different task on the committee from volunteering to make posters and asking local business to donate items to be raffled off at the event to creating a fun spirit week. The Relay kickoff assembly was a success. Now I strongly encourage everyone to sign up and join a team to make this Relay one to remember.”

Since Huntington’s first Relay in June 2012, the event has raised $915,000. “Our goal is to reach $1 million this year,” Ms. Burton said. To register a team for this year’s event visit .

“The event is a chance for the whole community to come together for a great cause,” Ms. Burton said. “We will be having a reception at the event to honor survivors and allow them to tell their stories. We will also be lining the Blue Devil Stadium track with luminaria bags to remember those lost to cancer and those who are still fighting.”

The Huntington School Board has appointed Crystal Cass as this year’s advisor to the organizing committee. “We are very grateful that she has agreed to take on this responsibility as we wouldn’t be able to have this event without her,” Mr. Morris said. American Cancer Society representative Morgan Wright is also advising student planners.

There have been discussions of holding the Relay For Life event on either a biennial or triennial basis. “Relay almost didn’t happen this year, but we felt it so important to our school and it truly makes an impact in our town. Katie, Noah and I approached Mr. Cusack and he helped us get this event going. We couldn’t have done it without his help and support.”

The American Cancer Society has invested more than $4.6 billion into research for a cure since 1946. The organization estimates there are more than 15.5 million cancer survivors alive in the United States today, “thanks in part to our work.”

Since 1984 the American Cancer Society has provided 4.5 million free nights of lodging for cancer patients and their caregivers who traveled for treatment. The organization has also given cancer patients 7.6 million free rides to treatment since 2005.

Kids of all ages participate in Huntington's Relay For Life. (Darin Reed photo.)
Kids of all ages participate in Huntington's Relay For Life. (Darin Reed photo.)
Last year's Relay For Life drew hundreds of students. (Darin Reed photo.)
Last year's Relay For Life drew hundreds of students. (Darin Reed photo.)